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Your Questions About Commandant Of Auschwitz

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Carol Your Questions About Commandant Of Auschwitz

Carol asks…

Were The Nazi War Crimes Trials Illegal In Your Opinion?

it disgusts me that concentration camp staff and Nazi government officials were put on trial and executed or sentenced to prison time when in many cases Allied war crimes were just as bad, if not worse, such as the firebombing of Dresden and Tokyo, the nuclear bombing of Japan, and executions of pows and German citizens. it also disgusts me that George Bush, Donald Rumsfeld, and the camp staff will never serve a day for creating or working in concentration camps in Cuba and Iraq where conditions are just as bad as those in the Nazi camps, yet many of the commandants and camp staff of Auschwitz, Majdanek, Buchenwald, Dachau, etc were punished.

lizzyrose cropped Your Questions About Commandant Of Auschwitz

Our pick of the answers:

Totally legal and fair.

You have the NERVE to compare Auschwitz and Gitmo?

You’re suffering from a cranial/anal inversion.

Hey, how’s the weather in Teheran?

Linda Your Questions About Commandant Of Auschwitz

Linda asks…

Can you correct my english essay, please? (10 points)?

I have done an essay for my English subject and I need someone to correct it, because English isn’t my mother language. It is about Jone Boyle’s novel, ‘A boy in the stripped pyjamas’.

I will appreciate any help. Thanks.

It is a very dramatic story about Holocaust, viewed and lived by a nine-years-old boy Bruno, son of a commandant of the Nazi concentration camp of Auschwitz. And it is also about a children’s innocent friendship in the midst of tragedy.

The novel opens as nine-year-old Bruno comes home from school and finds that the maid Maria is packing his belongings. Then his mother explains him that they have to leave their beautiful five-story house of Berlin and move into another one that it is very far away, because of his father’s job, which is very important for the country. She says that the Fury (Fuhrer) ‘has big things in mind’ for his father, so they must obey and accept patiently their destiny.

But Bruno does not want to change his great life in Berlin, leave his friends ‘for life’, his school and his entertainments in his large house, where there are so many places to explore. So when their arrive to ‘Out-With’ (this is the way Bruno calls Auschwitz), he hates his new three-story house, without nothing to explore, the sad and bored surroundings and all the soldiers that come to see his father , calling him ‘commandant’, from the morning up to evening. So he wants to return to Berlin, but his parents tell him that it is impossible and that the house of ‘Out-With’ is his new home for ‘foreseeable future’.

Bruno does not understand why they have had to exchange their home for such an awful place. It must be said that their new house is old, small and often full of soldiers, so the boy has a lot of reasons not to like it. But the most horrible thing is that, next to house, there is a large fence that is separating the Bruno’s house from a lot of people, people that are wearing the same clothes as each other: a pair of grey striped pyjamas with a grey striped cap on their heads. There are elderly men, young men and even kids and they all are very thin and pale.

Bruno sees this place from the window of his bedroom and he decides to ask his father about what all those people were doing there. But his father tells him that they aren’t even people and orders Bruno not to come near the fence.

As time passes, Bruno feels very lonely: he doesn’t have any friends so he can’t play with anyone. So he hates his new house more and more. Specially, he hates Lieutenant Kotler, a young man who often treats badly to Bruno and to the other people of the house, although he is liked a lot by the Bruno’s elder sister, Gretel. But fortunately, Kotler was sent away by Bruno’s father (because Kotler’s father has left Germany in its difficult time).

But, as the plot progresses, Bruno slowly gets used to his environment. One day he decides to explore the surroundings and that is when he meets a boy named Shmuel on the other side of the fence. It turns out that he and Shmuel were both born on the same day and soon they becomes very close friends, because Bruno likes Shmuel a lot and he supposes to be the only person Bruno can talk to. So Bruno visits him daily, often sneaking food for him from the kitchen.

The boys talk about their lives before and after their moving to ‘Out-With’ and their share different experiences of their lives. But Bruno does not tell his family about his new friends because his parents could forbid Bruno seeing Shmuel: Shmuel was a Jewish boy, and ‘the commandant’ could not stand his son talking or treating to Jews.

But, nevertheless, Bruno often comes to visit Shmuel after his boring classes with Herr Liszt. Actually, Shmuel makes Bruno feel better and happier, so he even forgets his life in Berlin.

But his mother is unhappy: she thinks that ‘Out-With’ isn’t a good place for children, so the family decides to that it would be better to mother, Bruno and Gretel to return the family’s old home in Berlin. Bruno feels sad about it because he does not want to leave his new ‘best friend for life’.

As a farewell, the boys decide to make Bruno to put on striped pajamas and climb under a loose wire in the fence to help Shmuel find his father, who went missing in the camp. And that is what they do: Bruno takes off his clothes and puts on the stripped pyjamas that Shmuel has given him and he climbs under the fence.

Bruno doesn’t like the place where his friend lives: people are too sad, pale and thin, and they are all frightened. So he decides to go home. But, as he promised Shmuel to help him to find his father, he doesn’t leave, nevertheless he is cold, dirty and wet because of the rain. But the boys are unable to find him.

Suddenly, the Nazis soldiers in the area of the camp start to force the boys to go on a march. There are too many people and the soldiers are very angry, so they cannot leave the crown. Despite of the panic, Bruno says that the soldie

lizzyrose cropped Your Questions About Commandant Of Auschwitz

Our pick of the answers:

It is a very dramatic story about Holocaust, viewed and lived by a [nine-years-old boy] Bruno, son of a commandant of the Nazi concentration camp of Auschwitz. And it is also about a children’s innocent friendship in the midst of tragedy.

By a nine year old boy
either a Child’s singular or children’s plural

Then his mother explains [to] him
so they must obey and patiently accept

As a farewell, the boys decide [for] Bruno to put on striped pajamas and climb under a loose wire in the fence to help Shmuel find his father, makes more sense

without nothing to explore, the sad and bored surroundings
With nothing to explore the sad and boring surroundings

so the family decides to that it would be better {for} mother

puts on the stripped pyjamas – striped

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